Laos, the only landlocked country in Southeast Asia, is one of the most ethnically diverse countries in the world. Roughly half of the population identify as ethnic Lao, while the other half are officially classified into 47 recognized ethnic groups. Due to its mountainous terrain and limited infrastructure, however, the people of Laos have historically encountered relatively few travelers. Following recent efforts to modernize and develop, Laos actively promotes its ethnic and cultural diversity for their emerging tourism industry. We celebrate diversity of Laos by sharing their stories below.


 

Tourists know Tak Bat as the age-old and picturesque daily Buddhist Alms Giving procession of the monks. The people of Luang Prabang remind us that Tak Bat is more than meets the eye, but a part of their living Buddhist heritage. 

 

 
 

Aynoi is a middle-aged dancer, artist, and teacher in the Phralak Phralam tradition in Luang Prabang, Laos, who is devoted to teaching the younger generation of artists...

An older Hmong man on the outskirts of Luang Prabang struggles to balance two wives, eight kids, and his true passion for perfection in the only thing he can truly control...

 

Ounheuane, the one true lacquer-man in Laos, takes us along through his workshop in Luang Prabang as he strives to revive the ancient tradition of Lao-style lacquerware...

Even as the world changes around them rapidly, many devoted Buddists in Laos, continue to practice the daily alms-giving ceremony in the traditional way. Rising well before...

 
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30-year-old Alai Sayawed has a job and a family and plenty of other things to keep him busy, yet he chooses to spend the considerable time it takes to make his own fishing net...

Hmong people are one of the most distinguished ethnic groups in Laos. Their story is about the difficulty of being a minor ethnic group in a country mainly inhabited by Lao.

 

Being traditionally animist, the Hmong believe in the spirit world and the interconnectedness of all living things. The shaman helps rid the community of bad spirits, inviting good ones to stay.

The classical form of Lao folk music is closely related to that of the Siamese, but has unique characteristics. This very old Lao song, Waiting For The Moon, was recorded in Luang Prabang.

 

The story of the birth of humanity, told by a Khmu storyteller and village elder Mr. Bounyang Bualapha of Nong Khouay Village.

The art of seducing women with singing in Lao culture.